Harper's Bazaar editorial


As my surname is Harper, I thought it was only my name's right that I should do an editorial from Harper's Bazaar magazine. Lucky enough I actually found an editorial that supports my Native Nomads trend.
Clearly a sign...


The November 2010 issue of Harper's Bazaar featured the editorial "A World Away".

"Breataking landscapes teams up with Meghan Collison & Norbet Schoerner for this dazzling editorial"
Snowy mountains are the perfect backdrop to Schoemer's work here in Harper's Bazaar. The chilly story showcases the season's best knits, prints & cashmeres. The back drop reminds me of Colorado, a common location for anything Western inspired. You'd think the Native clothing would merge with the background but personally I think it actually helps it to stand out.


This editorial follows a fairly earthy/stone colour palette, as the background is quite mountainous and dull colour wise. Colour in the editorial has been injected into the prints of the garments. The prints themselves represent and reflect their Native origin, yet I feel their use of bold colours brings them more into the 21st century. Compared to other research I've done it has more blue/navy tones. This to me is remimiscent of Georgia O'Keeffe's skull paintings, as the blue tones and central aim of the photograph is symbolic of them, potentially the editorial could have taken inspiration from them.

It's interesting how two are the main colours used within the intricate prints here are red and green. Whilst researching my trend I looked into the background of face paint within tribal communities, the colours red was thought to give strength whilst green was thought to be linked to endurance and harmony. It maybe a subconsciously thought out idea by the stylist, yet for a magazine editorial this big it would surprise me if it was planned. After all contextual references would have made the editorial more believable & the the trend more alive.



Lots of layers appears to be how this shoot suggest you wear this trend,  throughout my research layering up woollen, heavy fabrics seems to be predominant. However although my project required me to look into AW16, I did have a quick look into SS17, it was surprising to see the looks compared were actually very similar. AW16 had lots of muted tones, intricate patterns and this materials designed for warmth & comfort whereas SS17 was again intricate patterns, but more bright almost hippy inspired colours. Personally I feel the clothing in this editorial is very reflective of Native tribes only slightly more fashionable, the dark, dull colours make me think immediately of cold, winter days walking up snowy mountains. Whereas SS17 takes more of a casual, bohemian vibe.



The photographer of this shoot, Norbet Schoerner is a German photographer and filmmaker, he spent to early 1990's experimenting with layered imaging and digital post production, primarily in the face. He's had his work published in Vogue, Harper's Bazaar and NY Times magazine, whilst also shooting various campaigns for Prada and Lacoste.


"Native Nomads combines modernism with heritage"
This is the statement I'd make about this editorial. To me it has that traditional Native feeling but at the same time it feels more modern, more fashionable. A very early origin trend from at least 1865 has been modernised, brought back to life. Toning it down makes the trend more accessible to the consumers. Fashion conscious people may invest a lot of their time & money into this, but really you you don't have to have lots of items symbolic of Native American origin when you can have just 1 or 2 and layer them up.

One thing this editorial has taught me though, is that layering, contrasting, intricate prints is a key aspect to the Native Nomads trend.

What are your thoughts on this look? Would you invest into this trend? 

Take Care & I'll see you all soon.

X

Pictures are not my own

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